Category Archives: Elder Law Disputes

Legislative Update: Virginia’s General Assembly Acts to Reduce Inconsistencies between Revocable Living Trusts and Wills

As more people elect to use revocable living trusts for estate planning purposes instead of traditional wills, the disposition of property will increasingly depend on the interpretation and determination of revocable living trust provisions.  Virginia’s General Assembly (“General Assembly”), Virginia’s state legislature, recently acted, with House Bill 746, to address some of the principles governing revocable living trusts.  House Bill 746, which has been signed into law, amends several statutory sections of the Virginia Code relating to trust and estate law (collectively, the “Amendments”).  The Amendments serve to reduce some inconsistencies in the substance and interpretation of revocable living trusts …

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Posted in Elder Law Disputes, General, Legal Terminology, New Laws, Trust Disputes, Will Disputes \ Comments Off on Legislative Update: Virginia’s General Assembly Acts to Reduce Inconsistencies between Revocable Living Trusts and Wills

Raise It or Waive It?: The Virginia Supreme Court Weighs in on When Parties in Estate Litigation Must Raise (or Waive) Testamentary Capacity/Undue Influence Claims

Imagine your aging, widowed mother (“Mother”) has dementia and moves into assisted living.  You live about four hours away from Mother.  Your sibling (“Sibling”) lives about five (5) minutes away from Mother.  Sibling becomes increasingly involved in Mother’s affairs.  One day Sibling provides you with a copy of Mother’s recently changed will.  The new will leaves everything to Sibling.  Given Mother’s dementia, you are highly concerned because you don’t think Mother had the capacity to make the new will.  You ask Sibling about the new will.  Sibling says “It’s what Mother wants.” Later, Sibling files a lawsuit seeking to be …

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Posted in Court Opinions, Disinheriting Family Members, Elder Law Disputes, General, Guardianship/Conservatorship Proceedings, Legal Terminology, New Laws, Power of Attorney Disputes, Undue Influence, Will Disputes \ Comments Off on Raise It or Waive It?: The Virginia Supreme Court Weighs in on When Parties in Estate Litigation Must Raise (or Waive) Testamentary Capacity/Undue Influence Claims

Undue Influence in Virginia: Does the Undue Influencer Have to Be a Beneficiary?

Without question, one of the most common estate disputes we see centers around allegations that one person unduly influenced another person to write (or re-write) a will or trust.  The typical situation involves an elderly person, no longer capable of living independently, who becomes increasingly reliant on another person for care and assistance. Under Virginia law, undue influence occurs when a testator’s free will is destroyed due to the influencer’s close relationship with the testator.  This theory is one of the most common methods used to attack a will or trust.  There are different ways to prove undue influence.  Undue …

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Posted in Court Opinions, Disinheriting Family Members, Elder Law Disputes, Fiduciary Accounting Requirements, General, Legal Terminology, New Laws, Preventing Disputes, Trust Disputes \ Comments Off on Undue Influence in Virginia: Does the Undue Influencer Have to Be a Beneficiary?

The Role of the Commissioner of Accounts in Virginia Estate and Trust Administration

People typically picture the probate process going something like this: a person dies, you find their will, you take the will to the courthouse, the executor pays the debts, and then the executor distributes the assets.   Of course, the process is much more complicated and time-consuming than that.  Moreover, there are also multiple people involved in the process of administering an estate or testamentary trust.  One of these critical people is the Commissioner of Accounts. If you are serving, or have served, as the executor or administrator of an estate in Virginia, you will no doubt have been in contact …

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Posted in Court Opinions, Elder Law Disputes, Fiduciary Accounting Requirements, Fiduciary Duties, General, Guardianship/Conservatorship Proceedings, Legal Terminology, Trust Disputes, Will Disputes \ Comments Off on The Role of the Commissioner of Accounts in Virginia Estate and Trust Administration

Be Careful With That Power of Attorney!: Arbitration Clauses and Nursing Home Lawsuits

On May 15, 2017, the Supreme Court of the United States handed down its opinion in Kindred Nursing Centers, L.P. v. Clark.  This case addressed the issue of whether an agent acting pursuant to a power of attorney could bind an estate to an arbitration agreement. The facts of the case were simple.  Beverly and Janis, family members of Joe and Olive respectively, each held their family member’s respective power of attorney.  Joe and Olive moved into a nursing home operated by Kindred Nursing Centers, L.P. (“Kindred”).  Beverly and Janis used their family members’ powers of attorney to sign an …

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Posted in Court Opinions, Elder Law Disputes, General, Legal Terminology, Long Term Care Facilities, New Laws, Power of Attorney Disputes \ Comments Off on Be Careful With That Power of Attorney!: Arbitration Clauses and Nursing Home Lawsuits

Recognizing Signs of Elder Abuse (and Traits of Elder Abusers)

My goal in this blog post is to discuss character traits of elder abusers so that you can recognize them and hopefully protect yourself, your family, and your friends. I’ve handled over 100 estate disputes, and in a sizeable number of those cases, elder abusers committed an array of unethical actions including isolating, threatening, and pressuring elderly people to change their estate plans. I previously wrote a lengthy blog post that discussed the signs of undue influence of elders. That blog post can be found by clicking here. By contrast, this blog post focuses on the character traits of elder abusers. …

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Misconduct Remedies Against an Agent Under a Power of Attorney

In a prior blog post, I discussed the duties of an agent under a power of attorney. In this blog post, I discuss the remedies that people have against an agent under a power of attorney when the agent commits misconduct. The first issue is who has standing to pursue legal action against an agent under a power of attorney? Virginia has adopted a modified version of the Uniform Power of Attorney Act that spells out the categories of people who can seek judicial relief against an agent. Under Virginia Code Section 64.2-1614, the following are some of the parties …

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Duties of an Agent Under a Power of Attorney

Many average people are named as agents under a power of attorney for a family member or friend, and most have little to no idea what they are getting themselves into. Many people also are aware of the fact that a relative may serve as agent under a power of attorney for a family member or friend, and may be ignorant of how much financial mischief that person could commit with that authority. This blog post outlines the duties of an agent under a power of attorney. I will follow-up this blog post with another post in the coming weeks …

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4 Steps To Take If An Estate Dispute Is Brewing

If an estate dispute is brewing (but is not yet in litigation), there are several important steps that people can take to maximize their odds of success if the matter proceeds to litigation. In the vast majority of states, people only have judicial standing to challenge a will or a trust after the person who executed the will or trust (referred to as the “testator” or “settlor,” respectively) has passed away. There are often scenarios where a person believes that the testator/settlor was pressured into making the will/trust; didn’t have adequate testamentary capacity to do so; etc., and the testator/settlor …

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Top 10 Ways To Be Disinherited (And How To Avoid That) (Part 2)

This is Part 2 in the series of the top 10 factors that I’ve seen that lead to people being disinherited from a relative’s or friend’s estate plan. In Part 1, I discussed 5 of the 10 factors, and the following round out the final 5 factors. Knowing these factors will hopefully help ensure that you not only avoid being disinherited, but perhaps, more importantly, help ensure that you have deeper and more meaningful relationships with family and friends: 6) File a Guardianship and Conservatorship Action Against a Relative There are two main reasons why a person would file a …

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