Tag Archives: Estate litigation

Using “Nonmarital Child” Instead of “Illegitimate Child”

Estate litigation cases often feature children born outside of wedlock. In those instances, estate litigators face a choice as to what terminology they should use to characterize such children. Selecting the appropriate phrase is not just important for purposes of pleadings and motions (to be read by a judge), but also for purposes of trying a case in front of a jury. Throughout American history, society has used three main terms to refer to such persons: “bastard children”, “illegitimate children”, and “nonmarital children”. The phrase “illegitimate child” is quickly (and thankfully) falling out of acceptance. There are many reasons why …

[ CONTINUE READING ]

Posted in Legal Terminology \ Comments Off on Using “Nonmarital Child” Instead of “Illegitimate Child”

New Law Enables Possible Recovery Of Attorney’s Fees On Grounds Of Undue Influence

Last year, the Virginia General Assembly adopted a new law that went into effect on July 1, 2014.  Virginia Code Section 8.01-221.2. provides as follows: “In any civil action to rescind a deed, contract, or other instrument, the court may award to the plaintiff reasonable attorney fees and costs associated with bringing such action where the court finds, by clear and convincing evidence, that the deed, contract, or other instrument was obtained by fraud or undue influence on the part of the defendant.” In other words, the court has the option (note the use of the word “may”, as opposed …

[ CONTINUE READING ]

Posted in New Laws, Undue Influence \ Comments Off on New Law Enables Possible Recovery Of Attorney’s Fees On Grounds Of Undue Influence