Tag Archives: will interpretation

Prior Correspondence: A Key Tool in Preparing Your Estate Dispute Case for Trial

Technology, particularly relating to communication, is ubiquitous and ever-expanding in scope and ability. From text messaging to social media, there are seemingly more ways to communicate now than ever before. Is that correspondence admissible at trial? Trials are governed by the rules of evidence. These rules are detailed, nuanced, and not always intuitive. As practitioners, we typically become involved in estate disputes weeks, months, or even years after the initial dispute breaks out. During this time, a great deal of potentially relevant evidence has likely been generated through the exchange of emails, texts, letters, and the like.

Posted in Disinheriting Family Members, Elder Law Disputes, Elective share, General, intestacy, Legal Terminology, Preventing Disputes, Will Disputes \ Comments Off on Prior Correspondence: A Key Tool in Preparing Your Estate Dispute Case for Trial

What Happens When a Will’s Language is Inconsistent with the Titling of an Account Held with Survivorship?

A common question on most financial/investment account applications is whether an account-holder desires to own the account with one or more persons, with or without survivorship. Owning an account with “survivorship” means that upon the passing of one account-holder, the entirety of the funds will pass to the surviving account-holder (regardless of what the departed account-holder’s will or trust provides). A common question that we encounter is what happens when a will’s language is inconsistent with the titling of an account held with survivorship? The short answer is that the survivorship titling of the account will typically control over a …

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Posted in Disinheriting Family Members, Elder Law Disputes, Elective share, General, intestacy, Legal Terminology, Preventing Disputes, Will Disputes \ Comments Off on What Happens When a Will’s Language is Inconsistent with the Titling of an Account Held with Survivorship?

A Bewildering Bequest: The Supreme Court of Virginia Weighs in on the Meaning of a Will’s Residuary Clause

Most people are familiar with the basic contents of a will.  Wills typically name an executor, order the payment of debts and expenses, and provide for the distribution of the testator’s (will-maker) property.  Many wills provide for specific property to pass to specific people.  These are known as specific bequests or devises.  In addition to such bequests or devises, most wills contain a residuary clause – sort of a catch-all disposition for all of the rest and remainder of the estate.  They typically read something like this: “I leave all of the rest, residue, and remainder of my property, of …

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Posted in Court Opinions, Disinheriting Family Members, Elder Law Disputes, Elective share, General, intestacy, Legal Terminology, New Laws, Preventing Disputes, Will Disputes \ Comments Off on A Bewildering Bequest: The Supreme Court of Virginia Weighs in on the Meaning of a Will’s Residuary Clause

Legislative Update: Virginia’s General Assembly Acts to Reduce Inconsistencies between Revocable Living Trusts and Wills

As more people elect to use revocable living trusts for estate planning purposes instead of traditional wills, the disposition of property will increasingly depend on the interpretation and determination of revocable living trust provisions.  Virginia’s General Assembly (“General Assembly”), Virginia’s state legislature, recently acted, with House Bill 746, to address some of the principles governing revocable living trusts.  House Bill 746, which has been signed into law, amends several statutory sections of the Virginia Code relating to trust and estate law (collectively, the “Amendments”).  The Amendments serve to reduce some inconsistencies in the substance and interpretation of revocable living trusts …

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Posted in Elder Law Disputes, General, Legal Terminology, New Laws, Trust Disputes, Will Disputes \ Comments Off on Legislative Update: Virginia’s General Assembly Acts to Reduce Inconsistencies between Revocable Living Trusts and Wills